The importer has (mostly) caught up!

Apr. 19th, 2017 11:02 pm
denise: Image: Me, facing away from camera, on top of the Castel Sant'Angelo in Rome (Default)
[staff profile] denise posting in [site community profile] dw_maintenance
Our content importer has mostly caught up with its backlog; almost everything that's still listed as being "in the queue" are jobs that were tried, failed once or more with a temporary failure, and are waiting to try again. (The importer tries a few times, at successively longer intervals, when it gets a failure it thinks might be temporary/might correct itself later on.) This means that new imports scheduled now should complete in hours (or even minutes), not the "several days" it's been taking.

If you tried to schedule a second import while the first one was still running, at any time in the past 10 days or so, you may have confused the poor thing. If you think your import should be finished by now and it isn't, and you're seeing "Aborted" on the Importer Status part of the Importer page, feel free to open a support request in the Importer category and we'll look into it for you. (It may take a little bit before you get a response; those of us who have the access to look into importer problems have been really busy for the past two weeks or so, and I at least need a few days to catch my breath a bit before diving back into the fray! But we'll do what we can.)

I hope all y'all are continuing to settle in well to your new home!

(no subject)

Apr. 16th, 2017 01:24 am
aedifica: Headshot of me outdoors on a snowy day (Ice Palace)
[personal profile] aedifica
A note for my future reference: Last week was the first day it felt to me like spring was really, firmly here this year. We'd been having the occasional springlike day for several weeks, but it hadn't ever felt like it was totally spring with no winter lurking behind it.

(I suppose a winter picture isn't the most appropriate icon for this post, but I don't have an icon that says "It's spring!" to me.)

Minicon 52

Apr. 16th, 2017 01:08 am
aedifica: Photo of me holding a teacup. (tea party)
[personal profile] aedifica
I've noticed that when I look back at old entries in my journal, some bring back memories while other entries are very detailed recountings of things I've totally forgotten. In the last several years I've moved away from that style of journaling, and I don't mean to imply that I'm going back to it regularly (since I expect to continue to just drop in from time to time, at least while I'm still in school) but here is one more detailed entry. (That is, one entry that is more detailed, not one more entry that is detailed. Though both are true. Can you tell I'm somewhat sleepy?)

I'm having an excellent Minicon! I think this is my eleventh--I know my first one was Minicon 42, since that's an easy number to remember, and I think I've been to every Minicon since then but I may have missed a couple of the earlier ones and forgotten.

Friday night Katie and I went to Brother Guy's talk on life in an absolute (benevolent) monarchy, i.e. the Vatican. I'm glad she spotted it on the program, since I hadn't looked at the program at all yet. It was, unsurprisingly, very enjoyable. One of the things he talked about was the amount of maintenance old buildings require, i.e. lots. At the end he also mentioned two books or series that get monarchy right: Sarah Monette's/Katherine Addison's The Goblin Emperor and P.C. Hodge's God Stalk. I haven't read the latter yet, but I think I will. I already know The Goblin Emperor is excellent in other ways, so it's nice to know it did so well with the depiction of monarchy.

This morning I moderated a panel on How To Spot A Fan, with [personal profile] elisem and [personal profile] barondave. There were a number of directions we could have taken that panel, and I enjoyed seeing how it developed. Also, we started the panel with two audience members and ended with three and a half times as many (including the first two, who didn't leave) so I call that a win!

I had lunch with Katherine Levine--we were chatting after the panel and I invited her to join me for lunch. I enjoyed that! I hadn't met her before, at least not to talk to.

In the afternoon I went to the Ask A Scientist panel for the first time--I know the panel is a tradition, but I hadn't been to it; then watched Elise's table for a while (and chatted with Katie and Jeanne M); then went to [personal profile] pameladean's reading and heard some of the Liavek novel she's working on, plus part of a short story about some of the characters from The Dubious Hills. I was unsurprised to enjoy both the things she read from, and to want more of them. :-)

Then Katie and I had supper with [personal profile] mrissa and Mark at Parma 8200, with delicious food and even better company. (Which is saying something! I had salmon with zucchini and roasted tomato, and the flavors worked really well together.)

After supper Katie and I went back to the convention in time for most of Elise's reading of Mike Ford's work. I didn't recognize the piece she was reading when we walked in--something with a baron and a countess and an Ace and a spaceship launch?--but enjoyed it despite having missed the beginning. Then I went to Dean and Laura's social media party for a bit, as is tradition, and then came home. That is, to Katie's. :-) In the morning I'll go back and moderate the Fannish Hobbies panel, which should also be fun.

I am enjoying being back among My People for the weekend. That reminds me of one of the things that came up during the How To Spot A Fan panel. I realized during the panel that I considered myself an SF fan quite a while before I attended my first convention, but sometime after that convention my definition changed: the label "fan" that I applied to myself no longer meant "someone who enjoys these books" but "someone who is part of a community of people who enjoy these books (and movies and TV shows and and and)." It was a good change.

P.S. This is the first entry I haven't crossposted to LiveJournal. I created my account there in the middle of 2003, and it was a tremendous part of my social life for years afterward. I don't plan to delete my account--it's a permanent account, and I don't want to give them that--but I do plan to delete or overwrite my entries there, most likely overwrite them with a message about the journal having moved here to Dreamwidth.
jenett: Big and Little Dipper constellations on a blue watercolor background (Default)
[personal profile] jenett
Stories are now revealed for the Worldbuilding Exchange 2017, so here is my post talking about what I wrote, a Leverage fic called Pseudonyms Are Expected (You can find my recs over here).

I wanted to make a few more comments about process of writing, so here's that post (which I've also linked to from the comments of the story.)

Should anyone want to write other installments of this list, have fun with it! I did not get to write all the sections I wanted to.

(If there is a background conceit on why these were collected, I think Hardison gave them to Sophie as a present, sometime after the last message.)

Structural notes )
denise: Image: Me, facing away from camera, on top of the Castel Sant'Angelo in Rome (Default)
[staff profile] denise posting in [site community profile] dw_news
Hello, Dreamwidth! Goodness, this past week has been unexpectedly exciting, hasn't it? A warm Dreamwidth welcome to everyone who's just joining us: we're glad you're here, and we hope you're liking the new digs.

Before we get into all the things I have to cover, though: Given the reasons most people are citing for not wanting to agree to LiveJournal's new ToS, I'd like to take a moment and ask: if you're able to (and only if you're able!), please consider donating to the Russian LGBT Network/Российская ЛГБТ-сеть. They not only do excellent work across the Russian Federation, but are currently mobilizing to help evacuate LGBT people in Chechnya who are in danger of detention or death. (EDIT: If you're outside Russia, you can donate through All Out; the Russian LGBT Network website won't accept donations from outside Russia.)

To our friends in Russia who are LGBT and those who are against the mistreatment of anyone because of their sexual orientation: We stand with you. Please stay safe above all else, but if it would be safe for you to post that link, the LGBT Network is asking that as many people as possible publicly share the information that the LGBT Network is ready to help. (They also ask that you do not contact people in Chechnya directly to let them know, as there are reports the authorities are searching people's phones and computers for evidence of sexual orientation.)

The rest of this post is primarily to give y'all new folks a brief orientation (or as brief as I am ever capable of; no one has ever called me concise) to help you settle in, although I hope at least some of it will be useful (or at least interesting!) to those of you who have been with us for a while. Come with me as we discuss Dreamwidth's history, a bit of what (we think) makes us special, the answers to a few common questions about how we roll, and a few useful tips that may help you with the transition.


Dreamwidth 101! )

Whew! That was a lot to throw at y'all at once, I know. (Yes, I always am this longwinded. And I always use this many parentheses.) Everybody who's been here for a while: thank you for your patience as I got our new arrivals up to speed! We'll be back in a few weeks with a code push and a bunch of new features and fixes, so the next news post should be more broadly applicable.

In the meantime, let's have a welcome party in the comments:

* If you're looking for new people to subscribe to you, leave a comment with some basic info about your journal and what you tend to write about! Then everybody can browse around and meet each other. (There's also [community profile] 2017revival and [community profile] addme, both of which are unofficial but bustling lately; holler if you know of any more.)

* If you've been here for a while and have a favorite community that's active, drop a link and a brief description!

* If you're new or you've been here for a while, and you're looking for an active community on a particular topic, leave a comment with what you're looking for and people can recommend you some options. (We've done this a few times before, as "the great community rec-o-matic", and it's never a bad time for another round.)

* If you know of any scripts, resources, extensions, tools, or toys that will help someone make the move, get settled in, or customize their DW experience once they're here, drop a link and a description in the comments. (We can't be responsible for unofficial tools, scripts, extensions, etc, so use at your own risk, but I know there are a bunch of them floating around!)

Finally, a quick note on the importer queue: it's still going, I swear. The jobs finishing now are the ones that were scheduled around 48 hours ago, though, so we really appreciate how patient y'all are being!

As always, if you're having problems with Dreamwidth, Support can help you; for notices of site problems and downtime, check [site community profile] dw_maintenance and the Twitter status account. (We can't do support through Twitter, though! Open a support request instead. Me trying to fit into 140 characters is not a pretty sight.)

Comment notifications may be delayed for an hour or two, due to the high volume of notifications generated after an update is posted to [site community profile] dw_news. This was posted at 5:30AM EDT (see in your time zone). Please don't worry about delayed notifications until at least two hours after that.

Let's have a salon

Apr. 12th, 2017 08:00 am
jenett: Big and Little Dipper constellations on a blue watercolor background (Default)
[personal profile] jenett
Several years ago, I ran a series of weekly salon posts, where I'd post a topic to get us started, people would show up in the comments, and conversation would ensue. Now seems a good time to try them again!

(You should not feel restrained to keep on this topic! Start other topics! Encourage topic drift! That's part of the point. Feel free to ask random questions, there's a chance someone might know about the thing.)

This week's question


What are you learning right now that you're really interested by? (That might be a project for work, for personal stuff, a gaming geekery thing, a book you're reading, a podcast you're listening to, the fact you're learning a lot about Dreamwidth and how it works this week, or anything else.)

What do you like about it? What are you finding more challenging?

Things currently contemplating


I'm currently reading Dreamland: The True Tale of America's Opiate Epidemic by Sam Quinones, which is well-researched and has a really interesting structure where he's looking at different pieces of it through small slices (individual people, towns, situations) and tracing back to the origins as much as possible. I really like books where the information part is well done, but the structure creates connections between pieces of information in helpful and new ways.

Notes:


* Consider this a conversation in my living room, only with a lot more seating. I reserve the right to redirect, screen, and otherwise moderate stuff, but would vastly prefer not to have to.
* If this works this week, I'll do an updated FAQ and continue.
* If you don't have a DW account or want to post anonymously, please include a name we can call you in this particular post. (You can say AnonymousOne or your favourite colour or whatever. Just something to help keep conversations clear.)
* If you've got a question or concern, feel free to PM me.
denise: Image: Me, facing away from camera, on top of the Castel Sant'Angelo in Rome (Default)
[staff profile] denise posting in [site community profile] dw_maintenance
People who are worried because the import of their LiveJournal account has been running for a long time with no real signs of progress: please don't be concerned! The import queue is currently a little long. (In the same way that Mt Everest is a little tall and the Mariana Trench is a little deep.) We're limited in how many import jobs we can run simultaneously and how quickly we can start the next import after one finishes: LiveJournal, like all sites, has restrictions on how frequently we can programmatically request data from their site, so the import queue can get very backed up at times like this when more imports are being started than are finishing. If you look at the import queue and the numbers don't seem to be changing much, or are only going up, it doesn't mean that no imports are finishing: it means a lot of additional people have scheduled an import since the last time you reloaded.

As long as you haven't gotten a failure message in your on-site inbox, your import is still running. (Even if you have gotten a failure message, your import may still be running: if the site thinks that the failure is something that might correct itself, like being unable to connect to the remote site, it will retry for a few times before giving up.) If you have gotten a failure message, the error message in your inbox should tell you what went wrong.

The three common problems right now: 1) you mistyped your username and/or password; 2) you need to agree to LiveJournal's new ToS before they'll permit you to access the data in your account; 3) an entry or entries in your LiveJournal account have a text encoding mismatch and you need to follow the link in the error message to fix it on LJ.

If you haven't gotten a failure message, your import is still waiting in the queue, and will run when it makes its way up to the top of the queue.

People keep asking us how long the queue is (by which they mean, how much time will it take for a job just started to successfully finish: length of time, not number of jobs waiting). I would love to be able to give you a definite answer! It's really, really hard for us to predict how long it will take for a job to get up to the top of the queue, though: how long an import takes to complete depends on a lot of things, including how many posts/comments are in the journal. To give you a ballpark figure that might be off by up to 100% on either side: If I personally started a brand new import right now (in my timezone, the early morning of Monday 10 Apr), I would be pleasantly surprised if it finished before Tuesday morning (24 hours or so), would expect it to finish sometime on Tuesday night or maybe even stretch all the way to Wednesday night (36-60 hours), and wouldn't start to wonder if I should poke [staff profile] mark or [personal profile] alierak to doublecheck that something hadn't gotten stuck in such a way that our monitoring didn't alert us about it until Thursday afternoon or evening (100+ hours).

All of those time estimates, by the way, assume a relatively uncomplicated job that succeeds on the first try. When the site tries again after a failure, it includes a delay that increases after each failure in case the failure was due to transient network issues. So, I know some of you started an import at the end of last week and it's still running: some of you are trying to import very large journals, and some of you ran into errors along the way and are in a retry wait loop. Again: if you haven't gotten the final error message in your inbox (and it will tell you it's the final error), it's still chugging along.

You do not have to leave the importer page open or stay logged into Dreamwidth until your import finishes. (You do have to avoid changing your LJ password until the job is done, or it will fail.) You can close the window/tab and go off and explore Dreamwidth; the movers will be along in a little while with your stuff.

The tl;dr version of my usual longwinded babble: IMPORTER VERY BUSY. MANY PEOPLE MOVING IN. LIKE ON DORM OR APARTMENT MOVE-IN DAY, FREIGHT ELEVATORS VERY SLOW. BUILDING OWNERS RUNNING FREIGHT ELEVATORS AS FAST AS POSSIBLE AND APOLOGIZE FOR THE WAIT.

A housewarming glass of champagne/sparkling cider/fancy handmade soda for all! Welcome to the neighborhood.

EDIT, 10 Apr 2017 7:15PM EDT: the importer is not the only thing that is very busy today! I'm trying to get to all the comments here, but keep getting dragged off to handle other stuff (and will be knocking off for the night soon). If you have a technical support problem, it will probably be faster to open a support request, where there's less likelihood that it will get overlooked in the sea of comments.
Page generated Apr. 24th, 2017 07:30 am
Powered by Dreamwidth Studios